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spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since 1967 and really since not l
of the blame, mohamed morsi appears to lay some blame on the israelis. is he torn with his fellow islamists and the need to maintain the treaty obligations with israel? >> martin, if he isn't yet, he could be soon, and that's, of course, the real danger here. if this thing goes on just for a short time, then maybe we wind up okay. but if it goes on for days or weeks, like the 2008-2009 war that ambassador ginsberg referred to, then i think all bets are off as to just how long the egyptian regime can really sustain this stance of sort of being between the two. you know, in a broader sense, of course, the cease-fire that hamas had respected for a number of years never reflected a fundamental strategic change by hamas. it was more a temporary recognition that fighting the what i they had been before wasn't doing them any good. on the other hand in their own eyes, the cease-fire isn't doing them any good either. and so i think they're willing to maybe, as mark ginsberg said, maybe, you know, roll the dice a little, hope with the morsi government in place, maybe things can be different and maybe
region, and they have a new mohammed muslim brotherhood, brand-new democratically elected but untested government. morsi wants to be as a statesman in the region, but he hasn't faced these crises before. >> thank you very much. we'll talk with you in the next few days on this especially. we have breaking news. moments ago eric holder announced a historic fine against bp for its role in the largest oil spill in our nation's history. bp will pay $4.5 billion for the deadly disaster in the gulf of mexico. the company will also plead guilty to a dozen felony charges including misconduct for the death of the 11 men who died in that explosion that triggered the oil spill. two employees also face manslaughter charges, and just moments ago, attorney general holder says this case is far from over. >> i want to be really absolutely clear that today's resolution does not, does not mark the end of our efforts. in fact, our credit investigation remains ongoing, and we will continue to follow all credible leads and pursue any charges that are warranted. >> holder says much of the money bp has agreed
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3